Author: Jess

I sew, I mom, I wife, I drink coffee.

Striped Birthday Tank

Boy number three turned four yesterday. To celebrate, I made him a striped tank.

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The tank is self-drafted and upcycled from an XL men’s tank top.

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The stripes on this tank are so rad. I love finding t-shirts on clearance to use as fabric, because sometimes you can find some fabulous prints that you can’t find elsewhere.

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Tanks are quick and easy; I made this one in less than 20 minutes – including a serger re-thread!

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He loves this tank so much, he insisted on sleeping in it as well. Point one for mama-made!

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I used ribbing for the neckline and coverstitched the armholes. You can get this same effect with a double needle.striped tank 8
I love four. When they’re really out of toddler-hood, but not quite a kid. You can reason with them, but they still curl in your lap and need you to kiss their owies. So perfect. :)

Happy sewing, friends!

 

Safari Kudzu Coveralls

It’s no surprise how much I love the Kudzu Coveralls pattern, from Sew Like My Mom. I’ve made them as both pants and a dress, and there’s pretty much no end to my Kudzu love.Kudzu Coveralls pattern by Sew Like My Mom
These pants were supposed to be for Easter. You know, in April. But then the kids got hit by some illnesses, and handmade outfits got put on the back burner.

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These are a quick sew and have endless possibilities. I just adore little boys in overalls. I mean, is there anything cuter??

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Since this little guy is my baby, I wanted to keep the coveralls young. Because I’m going to keep him looking the part of the baby as long as possible. ;) But I also really love this seersucker version from Stacey at Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts for an older boy.

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I made the 2T size for my two-year-old. He and his cloth diaper fit perfectly.

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I cut and partially sewed them so long ago, that I can’t remember if I made any modifications. Probably I didn’t measure the cuffs and just eyeballed it.

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Babies in overalls. There’s nothing else I need in life.

Happy sewing, friends!

Sewing in a small, shared space [Sewing room tour!]

We live in a pretty small house. Not tiny house movement small, but still small, especially when it’s shared by six people. As our family has grown, my sewing room has moved around – the basement, the office… currently, I’m sewing in part of our bedroom. Sewing in a small space can be a challenge, but it’s still possible to have an inspiring place to create. Sit back and take a little tour of my sewing room!

Sewing in a small, shared space

When you sew in a shared space, you probably don’t have a lot of room to spread out. You need to be efficient with your storage and your usable space. It also means keeping your space a lot cleaner than you would if you could just close the door at the end of the night. But when you sew right next to your bed, you’ve got to keep things at least a little bit organized!

*This post contains affiliate links*

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I have enough room for two tables. I have a low table where I keep my serger, coverstitch, and sewing machine. I also have a counter-height cutting table.

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Since I’m not a quilter, I find that I usually have plenty of space on the table, even with all three machines. I can easily shift one over a bit if I need to. I can also quickly switch from serger to coverstitch when sewing with knits, which I find super convenient.

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I keep my thread spools close by, but I will fully admit they are NOT rainbow-tized. Seriously, I do not have time for that, friends! I’m just happy they make it back on their little rack. ;)

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Small spaces don’t have to lack personality. Since this one little corner of the house is just mine, I wanted to feel good every time I’m here. These sweet hoops are from my friend Alyson, and the print is from Mandy England (whose shop appears to be closed now).

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On the table, I keep things I don’t like to get up to find when I’m sewing: seam ripper, bobbins, scissors, tweezers, button-hole foot, tube turner, etc.

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I recently found these divided containers in the Target Dollar Spot, and they’re perfect for organizing my needles. I keep them in the basket, too.

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I picked up a handmade, magnetic pin holder at a local quilt museum, and it’s become one of my absolute favorite tools. I keep my zipper foot on here too, so that I can grab it easily.

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Behind the table is my big fabric shelf. I keep my knits in the baskets. This is new since reading The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, and so far I really like this system! I can’t see all the fabric at once – I have to pull the baskets off the shelf to see everything inside – but it has definitely kept me from throwing everything on the floor in search of the perfect fabric. ;) I keep vintage sheets and bottom weights on the bottom shelf, and the bin underneath has clothing to upcycle. (I also have a bin with some jeans and sweatshirts in the closet… since I’m telling all!)

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When it comes to why I organize the way I do in this space, many decisions are kid-driven. For example, when you have a two-year-old who loves to turn on and off the printer all the time, moving it to the top shelf just makes sense. I try to keep most of my sharp things up high, as well as markers and paint. Because toddlers.

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I also have a small cabinet where I keep the rest of my woven fabrics. I recently went through all my fabric and took out a lot of things that I just didn’t love anymore. It gave me a lot more space for the fabric that I do love, and I can find what I need much more easily now. I also keep some more not-kid-friendly craft or office supplies in this cabinet. Like fabric markers. Because seriously… toddlers.

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On top I have a basket of knit scraps. I got rid of a ridiculous amount of scraps, because they just kept piling up. These are all good sized scraps, and most of them could make a toddler tee or baby pants.

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On the wall across from the bed, we have these built-ins. I keep most of my other supplies here. Bias tape, piping, hardware, extra scissors, cone thread spools, elastic, zippers, snaps, etc.

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I’ve been storing things in these Clementine boxes for years, and I have found a way to incorporate them in every sewing space I’ve had. The contents of the boxes change occasionally, but I’m not sure I’ll ever give them up.

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Across from my sewing machines, I have my cutting table. This is a recent purchase, and I l.o.v.e. it. My three-year-old pretty much built it on his own (seriously), so it’s incredibly easy to put together. It’s sturdy and has all these great cubbies. I’m not kidding when I tell you that I really do love this table!!

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Usually this table is pretty well covered with a project of some sort. Or something I’m hiding from the kids. Just out of the picture are the tools I use: rotary cutters, Gingher shears, rulers, pens, tape, etc.

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Because of the limited space in our house, we don’t have an office. So the computer sits on the end of the cutting table. It actually works really well, because if I need to look at pattern instructions or if I just want to watch something on Netflix, I can pull it right up. But it’s also easy enough to move, should I need the extra space. You can find a tutorial for the wall art here.

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Behind the table is where I keep my patterns and blogging/pattern shop papers. I also keep a lot of homeschool papers and books in this corner, because… I have no where else to put them. :)

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My sweet sister-in-law gave me these hoops that were used as decorations at her wedding. I love them just as they are, so they were an easy addition to my space! The fabulous prints are from Mercy Ink (top right) and Pen and Paint.

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Having my sewing space in the bedroom can sometimes be a challenge – if I relaxing in our room, I do have moments where I get distracted by all the projects I could be working on. It also makes late night sewing tricky, if my husband wants to go to sleep. No, it’s not perfect, and while I certainly would love to have my own sewing room again, I’m so happy with the space I’ve created!

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It’s easy to assume that everyone else has a gorgeous sewing studio, or to see beautiful sewing rooms on Pinterest and get frustrated with your limited space. But wherever you sew – on your kitchen table, in a corner of the basement, or anywhere in between – that space becomes yours once you sit down at that machine.

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In this season of my life, in my house that often feels too small, I’m choosing to be grateful for the space that I do have. For a husband who doesn’t mind that I set up shop in our bedroom. For kids who are thankful and excited for handmade clothes. For a fabric stash that certainly isn’t wanting.

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What do you love about your sewing space? Share a picture of it on my Facebook page! I would love to see it :)

Happy sewing, friends!

Why I Let My Kids Help (even when I don’t want to)

“Can I help, Mama?”

I know these words are coming as soon as I start to open the box. Sigh. The truth is, I really don’t want any help. I know that I can do this much faster on my own, without little hands and fifty bazillion questions and patience… so much patience.

But I look into those blue eyes, and I say yes anyway. Even though I would rather say no.
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It turns out, he’s really good with an allen wrench. He follows my directions, looks for the right pieces, and keeps track of the screws better than I thought he would. And he works hard. Harder than I knew his little three-year-old hands could work.

“I can do it!” he tells me, when I try to step in and speed things up a little bit. You’re right, baby. You can do it. And he does.

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It’s hard for me, letting go of the little bit of control I think I have. So often I just want to get it done, and please, can you just go play, so Mommy can finish this? But most of the time, the world won’t come to a crashing halt if dinner is ten minutes later or if the laundry is folded tomorrow instead of today. One day all too soon, they will walk out of my house, taking with them whatever they have gained from their few years in our home. I want them to remember how I let them help. How I didn’t care if they always got it right. How I handed over the tools or the dishrag or the broom and said “Thank you so much, I would love your help.”

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And while I hope I’m teaching them something, I think I’m probably the one who learns more. About letting go and not being in control. About putting aside my to-do list. About how much they really can do when I let them. Because that table, it doesn’t wobble. Not even one bit.

“Do you remember when I builded that table, Mama?”

I sure do, baby. I hope I always remember.

Sewing or Craft Room Wall Art

Whether you have your own studio or a corner of your bedroom for your crafting, decor is an easy way to personalize your creative space. This wall art is perfect for seamstresses, and you can change up the words to fit the kind of sewing or crafting that you love to do.

Craft Room Wall Art

Materials:

  • burlap
  • wooden frame/staples or glue
  • jute twine
  • hot glue gun
  • embroidery floss/needle
  • paint
    *This post contains affiliate links*

DSC_51191. Stretch your burlap over a wooden frame and staple or glue it to the back. You can also purchase pre-stretched burlap frames like this one. I’ve also seen them in local craft stores.

DSC_51212. Using chalk, sketch out the shape of a thread spool.

DSC_51283. Paint the top and the bottom of the spool. Since this is wall art and won’t be washed, fabric paint isn’t necessary.

DSC_51364. Cut pieces of jute twine the width of the spool. Use your glue gun to adhere them to the burlap. I recommend doing this one or two pieces at a time, starting with a small portion of each strip, so the glue doesn’t harden before you put the twine down.

DSC_51525. Sketch out with chalk the words you want on your art. Mine reads “cut/pin/sew/wear” but yours can say anything! Stitch over the words with embroidery floss – I doubled mine up to make the letters stand out more. To create a slightly different look, use fabric paint or vinyl transfers in place of the embroidery floss.

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Use a damp cloth to wipe away the chalk, and you’re ready to hang your art.DSC_5181

Then add it to your little corner of crafting paradise! I just love how this turned out, and it really makes me smile every time I see it.
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Wall art is such a fun and easy way to add flair and style to your crafting or sewing space!

Make Your Own Craft Room Wall Art

Summer Fun for Kids: DIY Pool Noodle Sailboats!

For our family, summer = lake. We live near Lake Michigan (which is amazing) and we vacation every year with my family at a small lake in northern Wisconsin. When I was packing up our swim toys, I had a great idea: this year we would make pool noodle sailboats! Simple, inexpensive, and hours of fun. You could do this at a lake, river, or even in your own backyard pool or tub!
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All you need:

  • pool noodle (if you have one that is ripped or broken, this is a perfect use for it!)
  • small stick or dowel
  • piece of paper

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1. Cut off a small section of the pool noodle.

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2. Cut the pool noodle section lengthwise. You can cut it exactly in half if you want, but we found the boats to float a little better if you cut them a little more than halfway.DSC_7770

3. Fold your paper in half and make two small holes to poke the stick through.

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4. Poke the stick into the center of the boat (we found it floated better when in the center vs. on one end of the boat). DSC_8102

You should also trim the sail to be about the width of the boat. If your sail is too wide, the boat will tip over. Ask me how I know… ;)DSC_8110

Then set your boat in the water and watch it sail the open seas!

DSC_7956My boys have been loving these boats! They’ve had such a great time testing them out in different conditions, with different sails, and a variety of “passengers!”

DSC_7894Rock passengers were the biggest hit, and also helped to balance the boat if there were any waves.

DSC_7882There’s so many things you can do with these boats, from races to experiments (how many rocks before the boat sinks? how tall is too tall for a sail?).IMG_5784

We discovered that the boats are also super fun to float with the noodle turned the other direction! If it’s super windy, this will also help your boat stay upright.

DSC_7936Keeping childhood simple and fun! That’s how we like it. :) Happy sailing!

 

The Summer Fun series is going on at Nap-time Creations, and there are some fantastic ideas for you and the littles to enjoy!

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Check out today’s posts in the summer fun series:

Frozen Pineapple at Nap-Time Creations

Orange Frozen Treat at Frances Suzanne

Ways to Play in the Sandbox by Messes to Memories

Pool Noodle Boats by If Only They Would Nap

Summer fun for kids - make Pool Noodle Sailboats! Easy, fun, and inexpensive!

15 Ways LEGO Encourages Kids to be Creative

As a creative mama, I think it’s incredibly important to encourage creativity in my kids. There are so many ways to do this, but in our house, LEGO is one of the biggies. Rarely a day goes by without the sound of my boys digging through the LEGO bins (parents, you know the sound!) and bounding up the stairs, creation in hand, with a loud chorus of “Look! Look, Mom! Look at this!” If your littles have yet to discover the joy of these colorful bricks, here are 15 ways Legos encourage kids to be creative:

15 Ways LEGO Encourages Kids to be Creative

1. Endless possibilities – There’s no end to what can be made with LEGO. Whether they’re using a kit or a box of random bricks, if your kiddos can think of it, they can make it. Creations can be however elaborate or simple as they wish.

2. Open-Ended Play – unlike toys with buttons and screens, kids can play however they want. They can tap into their imagination to create an elaborate battle scene, an enormous mansion, or simply play with their Lego guys and have them talk to each other. There isn’t just one direction their play can take, it can follow their whims and interests wherever they go.

3. Teamwork – Not everything can be built alone! Sometimes you need a brother or a friend to help you out, find the right piece, suggest a different way. Or occasionally (ahem, every.single.day.) your brother wants to use the piece that you want, and either have to cooperate and build something tougher or compromise and change your design.

4. Problem Solving and Perseverance – When something doesn’t work, when what you’re building isn’t turning out the way you want it to, you try it another way. Or start over and try something different. In sewing (and life!), there are so many times that I have to try something two, three, or more times before it turns out the right way. This allows kids to brainstorm and come up with new ways to solve problems.

5. Improvisation – Sometimes life doesn’t come with directions, and not every design can be found in a LEGO kit. The LEGO Master Builders who built the incredible large-scale model of the U.S. Capitol didn’t say “Hey, let’s make the Capitol Building!” walk into the LEGO store and come out with a kit. They worked for hundreds of hours, designing and building, making mistakes and changing their plans along the way I’m sure.

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6. Follow Directions, but Make it Your Own – When I’m following a pattern, I don’t always want to make it exactly the way the designer created it. So I’ll add my own twist and take it in a new direction. This is the beauty of creativity! My kids have gotten quite a few LEGO kits, but after they build them once or twice by following the instructions, they get an idea of how they could make it better or taller or faster or cooler. They get ideas and inspiration from the kit, but their creativity makes it their own.

7. Explaining your DIY – Let’s be honest, it takes a lot of creativity to be able to explain how you made something to someone else. It’s a skill that needs to be developed, and it doesn’t always come easily. My kids love to tell me why they put a specific brick in a certain place or how they got the front of their rocketship to look that way.

8. Don’t Worry About What Others Think – You love to build with only red bricks? Awesome. Your friend likes to build the tallest towers he can? Sweet. Your brother only wants to build race cars to see which one is the fastest? Fantastic – everyone can do their own thing, because that’s what building with LEGO is all about.

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The car racing ramp in Mayfair Mall at the Lego Americana Roadshow

9. Make What You Don’t Have – Isn’t this the backbone of every DIY-er? If my boys don’t have clothes for a wedding, I can make it for them. Can’t find pants that fit over baby’s cloth diapers? Design and sew them! The other day, my oldest said to me, “Legos are awesome, because if I don’t have a certain toy, I can just make it!” Thank you, LEGO, for helping my kids to love to DIY even before age ten.

10. Step Out of Your Box – Sometimes it’s hard to take apart the pieces of a kit and make something new. But after awhile, kids get brave and realize that if they use the piece that came with the camper kit in their flying car, it would make it even better.

11. Aesthetics and Design – It’s not always about function. Sometimes you really want something to look good. LEGO gives kids so many opportunities to practice symmetry and patterns and color blocking – all things I think about when I’m creating a garment or thinking up a new design. I don’t just want clothes that cover my body, I want them to flatter me and look good!

12. Builds Confidence – Don’t you love that feeling when you made something really awesome? And you get so excited to show everyone, and they’re all excited and amazed? It builds your confidence and gets you super pumped to do it again. When your littles make a car that really moves or a building that is taller than they are, it gives them the guts to try it again and to try something even harder next time. One of the first landmarks we saw at the Lego Americana Roadshow was the Statue of Liberty, and my boys were.in.awe. They couldn’t wait to go home and try their hand at something so jaw-dropping.

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13. Concentration – Have you ever tried to build something intricate with Legos? You need a lot of patience and concentration. Same goes for sewing, knitting, hand lettering, building furniture…. you need to focus on your craft to get good at it. LEGO teaches kids to sit in one spot and work on something for more than five seconds.

14. You Can Entertain Yourself – I have to say, I’ve never heard my kids tell me they’re bored. They know how fun it is to entertain themselves and stretch their imaginations and make something outstanding. They’ve had a lot of practice. The more freedom you give them to just build and play however they want to with their bricks, they’ll blow you away with what they can do.

15. Build and Understand What You Can’t See in Real Life – We’re not all lucky enough to be able to travel around the world or even across the country. We can, however, build a miniature version. And if you can’t figure it out? You can look at someone else’s creation. If you’re local and you haven’t checked out the Lego Americana Roadshow yet, there’s still time. It is AMAZING, and I’m not one tiny bit exaggerating. If you’re not local, you should find out if it’s coming close to you – and it’s even worth a drive! If it weren’t for naps, we could have spent all day there, discovering all the tiny details on all the phenomenal creations.

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You can still see the FREE Lego Americana Roadshow at Mayfair Mall through this Sunday, June 28th.

Mayfair Mall
2500 N Mayfair Rd
Wauwatosa, WI
Mon – Sat: 10:00 am – 9:00 pm
Sun: 11:00 am – 6:00

Disclosure: I am being compensated for this post, but all opinions are my own.

Easy T-shirt Dress Tutorial

Easy T-shirt Dress Tutorial

My basic everyday uniform is a t-shirt and jeans. In the summer, though, I love to switch it up and wear t-shirt dresses, so I can pretend I’m not being as lazy with my wardrobe as I actually am. So when Melissa invited me to join in on her 30 Days of Sundresses series, I knew comfort would win out in the end!

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Making a T-shirt dress (or a tank dress!) is super easy. I used two favorite patterns for these dresses: the Union St. Tee from Hey June Patterns (which I’ve already made into a dress) and the Greenwood Tank from Straight Stitch Designs. If you don’t have a pattern you love, trace your favorite store-bought tee instead.

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1. Lay your pattern (or your t-shirt) on top of your fabric. Measure from your armpit down to where you want the dress to hit. Remember that you will need to add extra length for the hem.

DSC_65972. Cut down to your desired length. Unless you want your dress to be form fitting, angle it outward slightly as you go down toward the hemline.

DSC_65873. If you want to give your dress a looser fit than it would be as a shirt, grade it out a little on the sides. If you have more of a pear shape, make sure you grade it out to allow your hips to have enough room.DSC_6772

Then sew it together as you would according to the shirt pattern instructions! Easy peasy!

DSC_6715The comfort of a t-shirt, with the sassiness of a dress! Basically everything I love all wrapped up in one ridiculously easy-to-sew package. If you start to sew them, though, be warned: you may not be able to stop. And with a serger and a coverstitch (affiliate links), you can seriously just fly through these and whip up one after another without even thinking about it. I may or may not have another one already cut and ready to go…

DSC_6752Both of these fabrics came from JoAnn’s and I think are lycra blends, so they have kind of a silky feel to them. Jersey fabrics will lay a little differently, but they also can be easily worn with sneakers for trips to the zoo or the park. You can dress it up or down, depending on jewelry or shoes. But you still feel like you’re wearing your pajamas. Who doesn’t love wearing their pajamas??

DSC_6716There are so many amazing dresses over at Melly Sews for the 30 Days of Sundresses series – for women and for girls! There are lots of tutorials, free patterns, and great dresses to inspire you to sew your own. Plus, there are giveaways!

Sundresses2015-250pxYou can enter this week’s giveaway – a mystery box of sewing yummies – and scroll through all the oh-so-lovely dresses.

Happy sewing, friends!

Turn a shirt pattern into a dress

LEGO Americana Roadshow

It’s no surprise that with four young boys in my house, we also have a lot of Legos. I love the open-ended creative play that comes with building everything from elaborate scenes or simple vehicles. My little guys can spend hours creating!

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Lego Minifig Carrier tutorial

That’s why I’m super excited that the Lego Americana Roadshow is coming to Milwaukee at Mayfair Mall from June 13-28th.

The Lego Americana Roadshow is a free event (four kids = we love free events) displaying large-scale models of American landmarks, made completely out of Legos. We’re studying U.S. History next year, so I’m super excited to be able to show my boys some of the landmarks that we might not be able to actually visit in person. The landmarks include: U.S. Capitol Building, White House, Supreme Court, Washington Monument, Jefferson Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, Statue of Liberty, Independence Hall and Old North Church. My history + lego loving boy is especially going to love this.

DSC_0158_zpsd909da50Lego Lunchbox Tutorial

You can visit the free Lego Americana Roadshow any day between June 13th (today!) through June 28th:

Mayfair Mall
2500 N Mayfair Rd
Wauwatosa, WI
Mon – Sat: 10:00 am – 9:00 pm
Sun: 11:00 am – 6:00

Disclosure: I am being compensated for this post, but all opinions are my own.

Create your own Summer Essential Car Kit

Summer days in our house are filled with play dates at parks and splash pads, zoo days, road trips, and spontaneous stops to get frozen custard. Over the years, I’ve gotten smart and have begun carrying some essential supplies in the car for the inevitable messes and to avoid as many meltdowns as possible. Because nothing can make a day go sour like a toddler melting down because his shirt is soaked or his hands are sticky or (Heaven help us) we forgot to pack a snack. My mom secret to disaster-less days is a Summer Essential Car Kit!
Summer Essential Car Kit - help curb all the mini-disasters that happen away from home

Every Essential Car Kit will look a little different, because each family has unique needs. And as the summer goes on, you’ll probably find that you don’t need something you thought you would or that you need to add something. I like to use the reminders app on my phone when I’m out of the house when I think of something that I need to add to the bin.

What to put in your Summer Essential Car Kit

  • Paper towels
  • Extra clothes
  • Snacks that won’t melt
  • Sunscreen
  • Huggies ® Wipes – even if your kids are out of diapers, wipes are a must. I can’t tell you how many times I’m so grateful to have them!
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Band-aids and/or first aid kid
  • Extra diapers, if you have littles
  • Water bottles (we prefer reusable bottles, but no one wants to be stuck without water on a scorching hot day!)

DSC_6785I put everything in a bin with a lid that snaps on, but you could also make a tote bag to put everything in. This is especially helpful if you want to carry your supplies with you when you arrive at your destination. I like to know that when I put it in the bin, it’s going to stay in there, and not fall out as the car moves or if it gets kicked around the car.

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One of my kiddos does NOT like to be messy. Anything sticky or muddy can turn into a major disaster. So carrying wipes with me is a non-negotiable. Huggies ® Wipes have Triple Clean Layers for handling even the biggest of messes. A change of clothes is also necessary to avoid meltdowns. I add clothes that are in the middle size range, since my kids aren’t all that far apart in age. They might be a bit too big or small for some kids, but will fit the kids that are most likely to make a mess and will work in a pinch for the others.
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Here are some other ideas you can put in your Summer Essential Car Kit:

  • Bug spray
  • Larger first aid kit
  • Bubbles (for when you arrive at the pool before it opens and have to wait!)
  • Sweatshirts for cool summer evenings
  • Blanket
  • Instant ice packs
  • Extra sunglasses or hats

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Stock your Summer Essential Car Kit before your summer gets too busy, Because Kids Outgrow Diapers, Not Messes*
Here’s to a meltdown free summer!