Simply Summer Romper – Tutorial and Free Pattern!

This week is Romper Week over at Sewing Mama RaeAnna, and at our house we love a good baby romper. I have a super easy tutorial so that your baby can be as adorable as mine (well… I’ll still think mine is the most adorable, if that’s okay ;) as well as a free 12 month size pattern!

Simply Summer Romper - free pattern and tutorial

If you have a baby wearing a 12 month size, you can download my free Simply Summer Romper pattern here (affiliate link). If not, you can still make one. :) When sewing with knits, you can use a serger as I did, or you can use a zig zag stitch to construct the romper. This post is full of great resources for sewing with knits.

Making your own pattern pieces (if you’re using the free pattern, skip down just a bit, because you don’t need this part):

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Take a romper of your own and trace it – allowing for seam allowance. You could also put a T-shirt and a pair of shorts together and trace them as if they were one piece.

DSC_0306I like to cut out half of it and then fold it over to make sure the left and right sides are going to be exactly the same.

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I cut this romper out of an XXL T-shirt, so I left the sleeve hems in tact. If you don’t do this, make sure you leave some extra length for hemming.

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Make sure you trace the snap facings. Your back and front ones may be a bit different, depending on how the pieces look. You will want to cut two of the front facings.

Putting together your romper:

This pattern includes 3/8in. seam allowance.

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1. Put the two back pieces Right Sides Together (RST) and sew.

DSC_03112. Pin the back and front pieces RST at the shoulders and the side seams.

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3. Fold the sleeve piece RST and sew along the short edge (mine is hemmed in this picture, but yours won’t be, unless you are upcycling a T-shirt). Repeat with the second sleeve.

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4. With the romper inside out and the sleeve right side out, place the sleeve inside the arm hole. Pin the bottom point (where the sleeve meets the underarm) and the top point (where the sleeve cap meets the shoulder) then carefully pin the rest of the sleeve. Sew around to attach the sleeve and repeat with the other sleeve.

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5. Cut a 1in x 16in rectangle of ribbed knit (mine in the picture above is folded). If you’re upcycling a T-shirt, cut off the neckline and use it!

DSC_03166. Fold the ribbing with the short edges together and sew. Then fold the wrong sides together and press.

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7. Pin the ribbing along the outside of the neckline as pictured and sew.

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8. Then flip the neckline inside. You can topstitch if you’d like.

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9. Pin the back snap facing to the bottom of the back romper piece, RST and sew.

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10. Sew the two front snap facings together with RST.

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11. Interface one side of the front snap facing and half of the back snap facing.

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12. Fold the front snap facing with right sides out and press.

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13. Sew the front snap facing to the outside of the front romper piece. Press the snap facing down flat.

DSC_033214. Fold and press 1/4in. of the back snap facing down and then fold and press the whole facing in half toward the inside of the romper. The raw edge should be tucked in. Top stitch it in place.

15. Hem the bottom and sleeves.

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16.  Attach your snaps according to their instructions (I like KAM snaps for their ease of use, but I think that regular metal snaps give the garment a more ready-to-wear feel). That’s it – you’re done!

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Rompers in the summer are our favorite!

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This romper is a super quick sew, and is so comfy for these little playful bodies!

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Don’t forget to download your free Simply Summer Romper 12 month size pattern here! (affiliate link)

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Head over to Sewing Mama RaeAnna to link up your own romper and win some amazing prizes! But if you don’t have a romper to link up, you can still enter to win some great prizes :)

 Click here to enter the giveaway

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And make sure you check out all the other fun rompers this week! Like my friend Melissa at Sew Like My Mom who has something ADORABLE to share today!

 

Happy sewing, friends! :)

DIY Monogrammed Drinking Glasses

Do you have a man in your life who is tricky to shop for? Yeah, me too. In thinking about what to get my husband for Father’s Day, I decided to get him a nice set of drinking glasses (since all of ours have broken… I’ll let you take a guess as to how that might happen in our house. ;) That seemed a little bit… simple. So I wanted to crank it up a notch and add a monogram. It turned out to be super easy – so it’s not too late if you want to do it too!

DIY Monogrammed Drinking Glasses

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

dsc_0684Awhile back, I was sent this great set of Martha Stewart paints and stencils like these that I used for this project. I remembered that in that set was some Martha Stewart Glass Etch Cream.

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The process is really simple, though I would suggest practicing first, before using the item that you want to gift to someone.

DSC_02641. Stick the adhesive stencil to the glass surface.

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2. Apply the etching cream evenly. After taking this picture, I added a little more to even it out a bit.

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3. Leave it on for 15 minutes – don’t do less than that. Then rinse the cream off completely and peel off the sticker.

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This was so easy, I now want to glass etch all.the.things.

DSC_0281Cheers to all the dads this Father’s Day!

Take better photos of your kids’ handmade clothes!

Ever since I started blogging, I have become more interested in photography. I want to be able to take great pictures of my kids and the things I make for them. Alida of Alida Makes just came out with an e-book called Style That Kid! that is all about doing just that.

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When Alida offered me a chance to review her e-book, I knew I could trust what she had to say — because her photography is ah-MAY-zing! After a quick read of her book (yes!! you can read the entire book while sipping your morning coffee!), I put Alida’s suggestions to work.

style that kid5Yesterday, I posted about the Oakley Shorts I sewed for my youngest. The first time I took photos of these shorts, I wasn’t happy with how they turned out. But a slight change in styling offered a big improvement!

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The two sets of photos were taken in the same location (my backyard) and with the same adorable baby, but at different times of the day.

style that kid4Alida’s e-book gives great tips on how to easily amp up your styling and overall aesthetic of your photos, letting your little one and your handmade clothing really shine.

DSC_0157One thing I love about the Style That Kid e-book is that I didn’t feel overwhelmed. Because I don’t know a lot about photography, I can easily get bogged down with technical terms that I don’t always understand or don’t know how to apply to my real life picture taking. That wasn’t the case at all here – I felt like I could take what I read and use it right away to improve my photos.

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Not only are Alida’s tips helpful for any blogger or etsy shop owner who wants to improve their photography, I know that the tricks I learned in the e-book will make a difference as I take every day pictures of my kids too.

DSC_0215I know I’m going to go back and re-read Alida’s ideas and suggestions more than once!

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Be sure to check out the other reviews this week, I’ve already been impressed by some of the before and after shots I’ve seen! You can find the Style That Kid! e-book here. You can also enter to win your own copy of the e-book!

Click here to enter the giveaway

Oakley Shorts Pattern Review

Awhile back, my lovely and wonderful friend Melissa from Sew Like My Mom sent me her newest pattern, the Oakley Shorts and Capris. Since I loved her Kudzu Coveralls, I knew that I was going to love this pattern too.

Oakley Shorts

Being the fourth boy, this little peanut has gotten his fair share of hand-me-downs. But sometimes they don’t quite make it that far.

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Like all of Melissa’s patterns, this one comes together beautifully. It comes in sizes 12months – 8years, and has some adorable capri options for girls!

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I made the 12month size, and the fit on my little man is perfect. He’s wearing disposables here, and they are a little tight when he wears cloth. If you’re a cloth diapering family, I would size up or add a couple of inches to the rise.

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These are the absolute perfect summer shorts!

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You can find the Oakleys (and the rest of the Sew Like My Mom patterns) here. Come back tomorrow when I’m going to share some secrets about this photo shoot… including what the first one looked like, and the tips I used to improve it!

Happy sewing, friends!

No-Sew Vintage Sheet Bunting Tutorial

I’m in the process of de-brown-ing my living room, and part of that includes adding some new wall art. So I threw together a quick bunting out of a vintage sheet that took about five minutes – no sewing involved!

No Sew Vintage Sheet Bunting Tutorial

All you need is some fabric (I used a vintage sheet that I thrifted, but of course you can use any fabric you have on hand), some twine or string, and some fabric glue or mod podge.

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1. Fold your fabric and draw a triangle with chalk on the fold.

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2. Cut out the triangles – I cut four to fit my frame, but you can cut as many or as few as you’d like.

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3. Place the fabric over the string and apply the glue. I used Liquid Stitch (affiliate link), but you could also use Mod Podge (affiliate link) or whatever you have on hand.

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4. Then just fold over the fabric and press together.

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5. Repeat with all the other triangles to create your bunting!

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You can hang the bunting on its own or put it in an empty frame like I did. I just taped the string to the back of the frame.

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I used it as the starting point for a big gallery wall in my living room, which I’ll share with you later! A little bit of vintage fabric love on my wall makes me happy. :)

 

Adelaide Top

I’ve kind of switched gears a little bit in my sewing and have been sewing a lot more for myself. And it is so fabulous! I had the super honor of being an early tester for one of See Kate Sew‘s new pattern – Adelaide. Friends, I’m in looooove.
The Adelaide TopThis pattern is oh so lovely. It is a really fast sew, and like every one of Kate’s patterns, it’s incredibly well put together.

adelaide3This yoke detail is so fantastic. The pattern comes with a ruffle piece for the yoke, or you can use a pre-made trim like I did. I used a vintage eyelet trim and these fabulous vintage yellow buttons. The fabric is also vintage – a linen that I found at a thrift store awhile back. I basically love everything about this top.

adelaide2The darts on this early test version are a little high, and they’ve been adjusted in the final pattern.

adeladie4I hand sewed the hem with a blind stitch … and my six-year-old photographer got this excellent shot of it. ;) I am seriously addicted to sewing for myself now. And between this one and the rest of Kate’s new Garden Party line, I could be busy for awhile.

adelaideYou will adore this pattern as much as I do. The sleeves, the yoke… sigh. Perfection.

Sew-a-bration of Women: shoreline boatneck tunic (take two)

When I’m shopping and I find something like a t-shirt or a cardigan that fits my body and I feel great in, I like to buy more than one. The same thing goes for a handmade wardrobe, which is why this is take two of this gathered tunic.

shoreline boatneck tunic

The first gathered tunic I made was a modified Shoreline Boatneck (affiliate link) from Blank Slates, and this one is too. (Though the pattern is fantastic without modification, as all Blank Slates Patterns are :)

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Today I’m posting as a part of the Sew-a-bration of Women at the Shaffer Sisters and Call Ajaire. It’s an awesome celebration of sewing for women – no matter your body type or age. Celebrating YOU!

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I’m still carrying a little post-baby love around my middle from my sweet baby number four, and this style of tunic is super flattering and hides that problem area better than some others. If you’re hesitant to sew for yourself because you haven’t lost the last ten pounds or are still nursing or whatever… just think of it as practice. Try out different styles to see what works for you, and the more you try, the better you’ll get.

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This tunic is long enough to wear with leggings (because leggings are not pants, my friends… cover up the booty is all I have to say), and the fabric from Girl Charlee is the perfect weight for summer, even with 3/4 sleeves. And pasty white legs, but you know, it’s spring in Wisconsin, these things happen..

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You can find the full tutorial for this tunic here and can use it to alter any shirt pattern to this style of tunic.

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You can gather it more if you like a fuller skirt, but I love just a little bit – and also, I hate gathering fabric. It’s a good thing I live in a house full of boys. ;)

Check out some more Sew-a-bration inspiration at these other blogs and get excited to sew for yourself!

DIY geometric typography tee [a tutorial]

My friend Stacey at Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy asked me to join in on her Fashionable Type series – celebrating all kinds of typography in fashion. I had a few ideas right away, but with the Straight Lines and Angles series still in my head, I decided to go geometric again.

geometric typography tutorial

I was inspired by this amazing typography, and I used some scraps of striped knit to create a similar design.

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I made my T-shirt out of some absolutely delicious Ponte de Roma knit from Girl Charlee, though this could be done on a store-bought tee as well. Here are the super easy steps…

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1. Cut out the letters from knit scraps and iron lightweight interfacing on the back.

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2. Trim any extra interfacing

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3. Pin the letters onto the shirt’s front. If you’re sewing the shirt, do this before you sew the front and back together. I like to pin the corners to keep the letters from shifting around.

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4. Then carefully top-stitch the letters onto the fabric. Go slowly and carefully so they don’t shift out of place. Since knit doesn’t fray, you don’t have to worry about finishing the edges of your letters. A ready-to-wear shirt will be a little bit trickier to maneuver in your machine, but if you go slowly, it should be no problem. :)

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A couple notes about this knit… I LOVE Ponte de Roma knits. They’re quickly becoming my favorite. They sew together gloriously and are super comfortable. My tunic that I made out of stripey Ponte de Roma (also from Girl Charlee) is one of my favorite handmade garments. Plus, how fun is this vibrant orange?!

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Funny side note: I actually made this shirt for my two-year-old. But trying to get a two-year-old to wear something when he doesn’t want to… yeah, that’s not a battle I’m willing to fight. Lucky me, I have another boy waiting in the wings who is more than willing to let me take his photo and just a wee bit taller than the aforementioned toddler.

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This is fun, right? ;)

The Fashionable Type Button

Now make sure you pop over to Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy to see the giveaway for Dead Ringer Designs, which has some sweet t-shirts, and to enter the link party.. and see what kind of typography fun A Jennuine Life for the series today too!

Spring Showers Jacket Tour

This week’s forecast is calling for a LOT of rain. So it’s a good thing that we’re prepared with our new…

Spring Showers Jacket

Spring Showers Jacket, from Elegance & Elephants!

Disclaimer: I’m an affiliate of Elegance & Elegance and this post contains affiliate links

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This pattern is nothing but fantastic. It has everything your kiddo could want in a raincoat (or even just an everyday coat).

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I picked up a tablecloth at Target in the clearance section quite awhile ago. It’s some kind of polyester… not stiff at all, and super wearable. I had in mind to make a jacket out of it, so when Heidi came out with this pattern, I knew it was a meant to be!

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My six-year-old calls it Joseph’s Coat of Many Colors, which is obviously the perfect name. :) The fabric is not 100% waterproof, but I plan to scotch guard it (thanks to Alida’s suggestion). I lined it with red flannel, since we don’t get a lot of rain when it’s super hot out. And it was the only solid color that I had enough of in my stash…

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I love how Heidi even thought to include a way for your little one to hang up their jacket! I used some twill tape, though there’s directions in the pattern for how to make your own.

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I just adore the hood. The visor is awesome. It keeps the rain – or sun! – out of their eyes. I would love to make a fall coat, without the visor, using a different fabric.

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And just because I can’t help but share… epic pattern matching!

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The pockets are so great – they are nice and big. You could easily snap or button them down if you want too.

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We’re big fans of pockets. :)

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This jacket is SO comfy. Perfect for running and playing. He seriously wears it around the house, he loves it so much! A stiffer material might be different, of course, but I love how Heidi designs with real kids in mind.

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Real, giggly, playful kids. :)

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The Spring Showers Jacket pattern is available for sizes 2-12, and is perfect for girls or boys! You can see this and all of the Elegance & Elephants patterns here.

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You can get your pattern for $1 off with the code TOUR. Make sure you check out all the other Spring Showers Jackets on the tour – there are so many great boy and girl versions!

5 Earth Friendly Sewing Projects

Happy Earth Day!

I’ll admit it… I’m a pretty crunchy mama. This is probably not surprising to you if you hang around my blog enough ;) I don’t like to be wasteful, and I don’t like to throw my money away on things that I’m just going to throw away. That is one of the things I love about sewing – using the resources around me and doing my best not to add more waste to the world. So I’m a fan of Earth Day, celebrating how we can be kind to our Earth and our future generations.

So I thought I’d highlight five of my favorite Earth-friendly sewing projects… a little upcycling, a little re-using… just what the Earth and I both love. ;)

5 Earth Friendly Sewing Projects

Sew your baby some prefold cloth diapers

How to make your own Prefold Diapers

Re-size a men’s button-up shirt for a kid

Re-size a men's button-up shirt for a kid

Sew a simple tote bag that you can re-use over and over

simple tote tutorial

Sew reusable baby wipes and burp cloths (or just wipes for kids who make messes of all.the.things)

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Sew a skirt from a vintage sheet (and add some doily pockets!)

vintage sheet skirt tutorial

Happy Earth-friendly sewing, friends!