tunic

Sew-a-bration of Women: shoreline boatneck tunic (take two)

When I’m shopping and I find something like a t-shirt or a cardigan that fits my body and I feel great in, I like to buy more than one. The same thing goes for a handmade wardrobe, which is why this is take two of this gathered tunic.

shoreline boatneck tunic

The first gathered tunic I made was a modified Shoreline Boatneck (affiliate link) from Blank Slates, and this one is too. (Though the pattern is fantastic without modification, as all Blank Slates Patterns are :)

DSC_0845

Today I’m posting as a part of the Sew-a-bration of Women at the Shaffer Sisters and Call Ajaire. It’s an awesome celebration of sewing for women – no matter your body type or age. Celebrating YOU!

DSC_0823

I’m still carrying a little post-baby love around my middle from my sweet baby number four, and this style of tunic is super flattering and hides that problem area better than some others. If you’re hesitant to sew for yourself because you haven’t lost the last ten pounds or are still nursing or whatever… just think of it as practice. Try out different styles to see what works for you, and the more you try, the better you’ll get.

DSC_0838
This tunic is long enough to wear with leggings (because leggings are not pants, my friends… cover up the booty is all I have to say), and the fabric from Girl Charlee is the perfect weight for summer, even with 3/4 sleeves. And pasty white legs, but you know, it’s spring in Wisconsin, these things happen..

DSC_0815

You can find the full tutorial for this tunic here and can use it to alter any shirt pattern to this style of tunic.

DSC_0820

You can gather it more if you like a fuller skirt, but I love just a little bit – and also, I hate gathering fabric. It’s a good thing I live in a house full of boys. ;)

Check out some more Sew-a-bration inspiration at these other blogs and get excited to sew for yourself!

Alter a shirt pattern to a gathered tunic [a tutorial]

One of the great things about sewing your own clothes is that you can make them how YOU want them to be. Have a great shirt pattern? You can make a tunic from it really easily!

Alter a shirt pattern to a gathered tunic  If Only They Would Nap
When Melissa of Blank Slates Patterns offered to send me her Shoreline Boatneck Top and Dress  [affiliate link] pattern, I was super excited. I love her children’s patterns, but I have yet to sew one of her women’s patterns. This pattern has both shirt and dress options… but I’m a girl who likes to have it all ;) so I decided to make it into a tunic.

DSC_0247
You can do this with pretty much any shirt or dress pattern you own [or you can even alter a shirt you have in your closet!], and it doesn’t take much.

step 1
1. You’re going to cut the front and back bodice into two pieces. Firs, cut the top portion, both the front and the back bodice piece – but cut them about where you want the gathering to hit. Measure down from your armpit. The Shoreline Boatneck has a line on the pattern piece to lengthen/shorten, and I cut my bodice piece about an inch lower than that. The front and back bodice pieces should be the same length.

step 2

2. Cut the bottom of the back bodice the same width as the pattern piece, but slightly longer. Measure down from where your gathering will hit down to where you want the tunic to end. [I ended up shortening mine after trying it on.]

step 3

3. Now cut the bottom of the bodice front. You want it to be longer [the same length as you cut the back piece] and wider, to account for the gathers. I made mine about five inches wider, cut on the fold.

step 4

4. Gather that front lower bodice piece you just cut. There are several different ways to gather. In this picture, I stitched a basting stitch and pulled on the bobbin thread to gather it. It’s more “proper” to use two lines of stitching.. but I tend to break the rules. ;)

step 5

5. Gather your lower bodice piece to match the top of the front bodice. You want them to be the same width.

6. Sew the two front pieces together, then sew the two back pieces together.

7. Continue to follow the rest of the pattern instructions to complete your tunic!

DSC_0295

This mint green and cream striped Ponte de Roma fabric from Girl Charlee is amazing. I may or may not have snuggled with it after it arrived, it’s that soft. Don’t judge… you’ll do it too. It drapes really well and has a great weight. It has pretty quickly become one of my favorite knits to work with, I think.

DSC_0264

One of the things I love about Melissa’s patterns is her sleeves. They’re always perfect! I also added pockets to the tunic – because everything is better with pockets.

DSC_0253

Now excuse me while I go fill my entire wardrobe with Ponte de Roma tunics… :)

This post is sponsored by Girl Charlee, who provided the fabric for this tutorial. [Thanks, Girl Charlee!] All opinions are my own.

 photo b9b7fdd7-f58e-471d-bdad-f41d70ed1a05_zps64e30f76.jpg

Flowery Tunic and Polka Dot Bows

Yes, I’m still continuing with my posts of my handmade Christmas gifts! I never want to ruin the surprise by blogging them ahead of time.

DSCF7253

My sweet niece Hazel [how cute is she?!] is just two months older than my youngest. This works out well for outfit sewing, since I had a pretty good idea of her size.

DSCF7240

I made her a tunic out of this super lovely crushed floral knit from Fabric.com [which they don’t seem to have currently, which is a bummer, because it is SO lovely]

DSCF7241

I added a little placket in the front with some ivory knit and some sweet lace that has a vintage-y feel.

DSCF7244

The bias tape and the adorable little flower button are both vintage. Which makes the top much more special in my eyes. Plus, I know her mama loves vintage, so I thought that would be fun for her. :)

DSCF7250

The pants are simple flat-front cords, made specially for that cloth diaper booty.

DSCF7246

I added simple polka dot bows to the bottom of the pants, to give them a girly flair. But they are just tacked on, since Hazel will have a baby brother in March, and I wanted her to be able to hand these pants down to him.

DSCF7263

Sewing for girls is pretty fun. :)

Charlie Tunic Pattern Review!

I am in LOVE with this pattern.

I had the honor of pattern testing the Charlie Tunic for Made by Rae. She will soon be releasing this pattern – and you need to RUN over to get it.  Or, um, click over to her site really quickly… anyway, it is a must have.

I tend to be of the draft your own pattern or just wing it category, so I don’t buy a lot of patterns.  But I could not have come up with this one on my own.  And certainly not the way Rae has!

The pattern includes optional facings around the sleeves, neck, and side vents.  They add such a sweet touch to this adorable tunic!

And if you have never used one of Rae’s patterns before (which I totally admit, I hadn’t!), it was incredibly well-written, with clear step-by-step pictures to help you along the way.  It was a very quick sew, too… well, would have been had life not gotten in the way.  Ever have those weeks where your sewing machine is calling to you and you feel like the entire universe is trying to keep you from getting over there?  Please tell me I’m not the only one who has weeks like those….

In typical Jess fashion, I upcycled a thrifted sheet for this top.  And who’s surprised about the stripes?  Seriously, who can not love this boy in stripes?

Rae is releasing this pattern soon – put it on your “must make as soon as that pattern gets in my inbox” list.

Check out where I’m linking up.